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HSE Campus in Nizhny Novgorod11th International Conference on PERSPECTIVES IN BUSINESS INFORMATICS RESEARCH

11th International Conference on PERSPECTIVES IN BUSINESS INFORMATICS RESEARCH

 
 
Keynotes speakers

Prof. Dr. Robert Winter

Full professor of Business  &  Information Systems Engineering at University of St. Gallen (HSG, Switzerland), director of HSG's Institute of Information Management and founding academic director of HSG's Executive Master of Business Engineering programme. In addition to foundational research in situational method engineering, he is responsible for design science research consortial projects in the areas of information logistics management (since 1999), enterprise architecture management (since 2000), integration management (since 2002), healthcare networking (since 2005) and corporate controlling systems (since 2006). He is department editor of "Business & Information Systems Engineering" / "Wirtschaftsinformatik" as well as member of the editorial boards of "European Journal of Information Systems", "Information Systems and e-Business Management", "Enterprise Modelling and Information Systems Architectures" and "AIS Transactions on Enterprise Systems".

Presentation title: Architecting the Enterprise - Current Practices and Future Directions

Abstract: After startiing with a modeling / documentation focus
and shifting to stakeholder-oriented information / analysis provisioning,
Enterprise Architecture Management (EAM) is evolving into a more strategic transformation support role in many enterprises. Increasing EAM
maturity however enables not only growing consensus on frameworks, success factors, organizational embedding and tool support, but also leads to an increasing diversity of EAM contexts, EAM goals and methodological extensions. A broad
empirical analysis of the state of the art of EAM in large enterprises
exhibits three fundamentally different current EAM approaches as well as
certain EAM maturity trends. At the same time, enterprises are starting to
implement different EAM units for different stakeholder groups and  / or project types. The analysis of this diversification is used to identify
design foundations for innovative,
useful EAM artefacts.

Prof. Dr. Boris Mirkin

Tenured Professor at the National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia. Professor Emeritus of the University of London, UK (Department of Computer Science and Information Systems, Birkbeck). Professor Boris Mirkin is an expert in the methodology for decision making and intelligent data analysis. His research interests include mathematical models, computational algorithms and programs for decision making, clustering and interpretation of complex data in knowledge engineering, organizational structure design, genomics, marketing surveys, text analysis, and other applications. Professor Mirkin is an active participant of large international scientific projects, the author of influencial monographs, and a member of Editorial boards of four international journals on the subjects. In his latest book "Core concepts in data analysis: summarization, correlation, visualization" published in Springer's Undergraduate Topics in Computer Sciences Series 2011, B. Mirkin "presents his theses with a refreshing clarity seldom seen in a text of this sophistication" (Computing Reviews, 27 June 2011).

Presentation title: Hierarchical Ontology of the Domain as a Data Interpretation Device

Abstract: The concept of ontology as a computationally feasible environment for knowledge representation and maintenance is receiving ever increasing attention. The term refers, first of all, to a set of concepts and relations between them pertaining to the knowledge of the domain under consideration. At the inception, the relations typically are meant to be rule-based and fact-based. However, with the concept of "ontology'' expanding into real-world application domains such as biomedicine, currently the core knowledge in an ontology is represented by a hierachical relation such as "is part of" or "is a". Research efforts in computational ontologies can be roughly divided into the following three categories: (a) developing platforms and languages for ontology representation such as the OWL language,
(b) integrating ontologies and (c) using ontologies for various purposes, interpretation of data among them. This talk will concentrate on results of the work being done by the author and others concerning three specific applications: (a) representation of research activities of organizations by finding thematic clusters and lifting them to higher ranks of the domain ontology (Nascimento et al. 2010-2012), (b) using Wiki text resources and annotated suffix trees for automatic completion of a hierarchical ontology, (c) interactive completion of a taxonomy for maintenance of the residential area infrastructure according to letters of complaint by
residents and its use for interpretation (Askarova, Babkin, et al.,
2012-).